• Fast fashion is proving hard to kill, despite Gen Z
    Shopping

    Fast fashion is proving hard to kill, despite Gen Z

    In today’s age, socially conscious shopping is en vogue. You might’ve thought that harkened the death of fast fashion, as a new generation of consumers has begun to shun its wastefulness—embracing, in its place, secondhand clothing as a planet-friendlier wardrobe—but according to vintage reseller ThredUp, that’s not quite true. While Gen Z’s heart is in the right place, fast fashion is still hard to quit. In ThredUp’s 2022 annual report on the state of retail, the company found that only 17% of shoppers say they plan to spend less money on fast fashion in the next five years, despite 50% believing it’s harmful for the environment and 43% even admitting they…

  • ‘Love Island’: UK reality TV ditches fast fashion in bid to be more eco-friendly
    Shopping

    ‘Love Island’: UK reality TV ditches fast fashion in bid to be more eco-friendly

    UK reality TV show ‘Love Island’ has partnered with eBay in an effort to ditch its fast fashion image. The series is widely viewed in the UK with audience figures in the millions and offers brands unparalleled exposure during its primetime slot. However the show, which sees conventionally attractive singles descend on an exotic location to find love – and coincidentally gain fame and fortune along the way – has long been criticised for its promotion of a polluting industry. This year’s contestants will wear pre-loved items from the e-commerce platform, sourced from a shared wardrobe in the iconic Love Island villa. The move is intended to help contestants find…

  • Slow down your shopping: how college students fall victim to fast fashion, and how to stop it
    Shopping

    Slow down your shopping: how college students fall victim to fast fashion, and how to stop it

    It’s already well known that in the world of socially conscious shopping, fast fashion is a dirty word. But when endless trend cycles and overconsumption are so normalized, how do we get off this high-speed train to nowhere? The fashion industry accounts for around 10 percent of global carbon emissions and uses more energy than the aviation and shipping industries combined, as reported by the BBC. Starting with raw materials, growing the cotton needed to make one pair of jeans requires more than 2,500 gallons of water, the same article reported. Then there’s emissions from transporting products from overseas factories to stores or home addresses. Even while they’re being used,…